Better Focus and Memory with Gingko Biloba




 

You have probably heard about this super herb, ginkgo biloba that helps with memory and focus. Research has shown that gingko is a powerful herb for boosting memory. However, that is just one of the many potential benefits Gingko has to offer.

Ginkgo has been used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years. It is traditionally used to treat respiratory issues such as asthma, wheezing, or coughing, incontinence, and digestive problems. It helps with circulation and is also used to cure depression and dementia, as well as for inner ear problems such as tinnitus or vertigo.

Its benefit for brain function is widely recognized. Ginkgo is used extensively to treat dementia in Europe. And the American Geriatric Society has also issue a statement that “Ginkgo biloba may help people suffering from Alzheimer’s.”

GINKGO BILOBA AND ADHD

Ginkgo leaves contain substances that thin blood and improve muscle tone in the walls of blood vessels to enhance blood flow, especially to the brain. Ginkgo enhances the nervous system by increasing blood flow and oxygen supply to the brain, which is frequently what the ADHD brain tends to lack. Ginkgo is also protects the brain against degeneration as a powerful antioxidant. Ginkgo helps to improve focus in the ADHD brain by inhibiting norepinephrine reuptake.

Ginkgo has shown good results in treating patients who have mental problems that are associated with circulation issues. These are issues such as memory loss, dementia, and Alzheimer’s. It has also shown positive results in the prevention of these diseases.

There is evidence that ginkgo leaf extract used in combination with American ginseng ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) showed improvement in ADHD symptoms such as anxiety, hyperactivity, and impulsivity in children age 3 to 17 year-old.

SUPPLEMENTATION

Extracts of Ginkgo leaves contain flavonoid glycosides and terpenoids (ginkgolides, bilobalides). Ginkgo leaf extract may be taken at 80-160ml twice a day. Studies have shown that ginkgo biloba is best used together with ginseng to get better results in mind clarity.

The herb is generally well tolerated, but due to multiple case reports of bleeding, it should be used cautiously in patients on anticoagulant therapy and those with known blood clotting disorders, or prior to some surgical or dental procedures.

Ginkgo may interact with medications. Please consult your physician before starting ginkgo leaf extract if you are taking any prescription medication for diabetes, blood pressure, seizure, etc.

Get your gingko biloba + ginseng supplements here…




Vitamin B6 and ADHD




Vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin and one of the vitamin B’s that make up the complex. It is found in one of three naturally occurring forms – pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, and three respective 5′-phosphate esters. Pyridoxal 5′ phosphate (PLP) and pyridoxamine 5′ phosphate (PMP) are the active coenzyme forms of B6 that participate in amino acids metabolism.

Inside the body, the naturally occurring glycosylated forms of B6 in fruits and vegetables have to be converted by the liver to the active form the body needs. People with impaired liver function, celiac disease, older adults, and children with autism and/or ADHD have decreased ability in converting vitamin B6 into its active forms. Therefore, supplementing B6 in its active form is more appropriate and readily available for use by the body.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

PLP is necessary for the conversion of DOPA into dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and conversion of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, to GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter. It is also involved in the decarboxylation of SAM to propylamine.

ADHD is believed to be the result of decreased dopamine activity. Low dopamine level in the frontal lobes is associated with decline in cognitive functions, such as memory, attention and problem-solving skills, while deficient of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex is associated with attention deficit disorder.

Related article: ADHD Brain

Dopamine plays a major role in the brain system that is responsible for reward-driven learning, and inhibition control. Every type of reward that has been studied increases the level of dopamine transmission in the brain, and a variety of highly addictive drugs, including stimulants such as cocaine and methamphetamine, act directly on the dopamine system. This is the same mechanism that caffeine works.

The other mechanism that B6 helps with ADHD symptoms is its use in combination with magnesium. Magnesium and vitamin B6 has a co-dependent relationship. While B6 boosts absorption of magnesium into the cells, magnesium is needed for the proper functioning of alkaline phosphatase, which helps the absorption of B6 into body tissues.

Signs and symptoms of magnesium deficiency includes sensitivity to loud noises, insomnia, anxiety, hyperactivity, restlessness, panic attacks, salt craving, and both carbohydrate craving and carbohydrate intolerance. Children with ADHD are believed to have lower levels of magnesium inside their blood cells. Since B6 helps improve blood cell level of magnesium, supplementing magnesium along with B6 will help with ADHD symptoms.

SUPPLEMENTATION

A study of young children with average age 6-7 years old showed improvement in behaviors, such as inattention, aggressiveness and hyperactivity with treatment with magnesium and B6. The amounts used were 6 mg/kg/day magnesium and 0.6mg/kg/day B6 – roughly 100-200 mg of magnesium and around 10-20 mg of B6.

Children with ADHD and/or autism have lower conversion rates to PLP, the active form of vitamin B6. Therefore, supplementing with PLP is more appropriate and readily available for use by the body.




Phosphatidylcholine for ADHD

 

What is Phosphatidylcholine?

That’s a mouthful. It sounds like something fancy. But it’s not. It’s actually pretty common.

Most of us who are not vegan or vegetarian ingest about 3 to 6 grams of lecithin a day. The term lecithin and phosphatidylcholine are used interchangeably because phosphatidylcholine makes up most of lecithin. Choline is another component of lecithin. Choline is a component of phosphatidylcholine, which is a component of lecithin.

Phosphatidylcholine and Brain function

Phosphatidylcholine makes up a big part of cell membranes. In order to make phosphatidylcholine, our body also needs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), uridine, and choline.The reason why there is such an interest in phoshpatidylcholine is because the body uses it to make acetylcholine, a brain chemical involves in memory, and phosphatidylcholine is shown to be able to increase acetylcholine level. PC is thought to benefit brain conditions, such as memory loss, Alzheimer’s disease, anxiety, manic-depressive disorders, and a movement disorder called tardive dyskinesia.

 

Phosphatidylcholine for memory

 

Unfortunately, the current research findings do not consistently support the role of phosphatidylcholine in helping with cognitive function, and that supplementation with PC does not seem to result in any dramatic effects on mental cognitive abilities. The benefit on brain function from taking lecithin or PC supplements is only minimal.

As mentioned earlier, a typical person consumes about 3 to 6 grams of lecithin a day, which means the risk of phosphatidylcholine deficiency is low. However, because each human being are unique genetically, there are always a few person who are difficulty biochemically in making adequate amounts of phosphatidylcholine from scratch. Certainly, these individuals would benefit from PC supplementation.

Don’t give up yet…

I have a colleague at work who swears that phosphatidylcholine works wonders on his 2 year old son, who was diagnosed with autism. I know, I know. He’s too young to be diagnosed with autism. But he does have all the signs – speech delay, SUPER intelligent. I know this boy’s developmental pediatrician. This boy knows the difference between trapezium and rhombus at a tender age of 1 year old. According to dad, he recognizes most of the alphabet (English alphabets) and sight-read a couple words.

Anyway, my colleague told me since starting PC, his son is able to communicate more and able to recognize kids of his age and interact with them. However, the oral aversion is still a problem. Did I mention this child is also on the gluten-free casein-free diet?

My point here is studies only tell you what’s most likely to happen to the general population. Until you try it out yourself, you’ll never know if you’re the responding group or the non-responding group.

Phosphatidylcholine supplementation is also recommended in the book “What’s Eating Your Child?: The Hidden Connection Between Food and Childhood Ailments” by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LND for sensory processing disorder and speech apraxia.

Supplementation

Start with getting PC from food sources first. Try eggs, soy, and meats. Vegetables, fruits and grains contain very little lecithin. If you plan to take the supplement instead, stay with a lower dose for your child, something like three grams a day or less

Other Uses of PC

Phosphatidylcholine is also used for treating hepatitis, eczema, gallbladder disease, circulation problems, high cholesterol, and premenstrual syndrome (PMS); for improving the effectiveness of kidney dialysis; for boosting the immune system; and for preventing aging.

Get this high quality phosphatidylcholine. It’s not just lecithin.